Ski Poles for Downhill & Touring (2022)

The Best Ski Poles: Buyer’s Guide

Downhill versus Touring Poles

Purpose is important. How you’ll be spending your time on-snow will decide just about everything about the best pair of poles for you. Below we’ll outline some of the qualities to look for in your poles depending on how you’ll be skiing.

Downhill

If you’re spending all of your time on the resort, there’s little reason to opt for a collapsible pole. Not only will you be saving yourself a significant amount of money, but you’ll also have a pole that will hold up much better in the long run.

The best downhill poles for the majority of skiers will be solid aluminum options with comfortable grips and a few different baskets to change out depending on snow conditions.

Touring

Having an adjustable pole for ski touring is important for a few reasons. Considering how you’ll split your time between going uphill and downhill, the ability to shorten your poles for trudging up ascents goes a long way towards ensuring your comfort.

You’ll also want to emphasize materials much more than you would with a downhill ski, weight starts to matter a lot more when you’re carrying it a significant distance.

Splitboarding Poles

Splitboarding poles have a lot in common with regular touring poles, if anything it’s okay to prioritize weight and packed size above all else.

Considering you’ll likely be using them almost exclusively for climbing, durability isn’t something to be overly concerned with.

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Park

Though similar to downhill sets in both build and attitude, park skiers prefer shorter length poles with less emphasis on baskets. It’s important to make sure that your park poles are a little more resilient than lighter options, chances are you’ll bend or break any pair not up to snuff.

Pole Length

By far the most common question about how to choose the right poles is in terms of length. For those new to the sport not invested in a crazy ultralight adjustable model, most likely you’re going to end up with a pair of fixed aluminum poles.

Pole length can vary depending on body type and preferences, but as a general rule you should be able to rest your arms at about a right angle on top of the grips. If you’re in doubt here’s a height chart for quick reference.

Skier HeightPole Length InchesPole Length Centimeters
6’7″ +56140
6’4″ – 6’6″54135
6’1″ – 6’3″52130
5’10” – 6’0″50125
5’7″ – 5’9″48120
5’4″ – 5’6″46115
5’1″ – 5’3″44110
4’9″ – 5’0″42105
4’5″ – 4’8″40100
4’1″ – 4’4″3895
3’9″ – 4’0″3690
3’5″ – 3’8″3485
< 3’4″3280

Having the right length pole is about more than just pushing yourself down cat tracks and having something to lean on in the lift line. Proper pole plants are pretty crucial for getting your timing down and mastering more advanced ski techniques.

Fixed versus Adjustable Poles

It’s already been established that how and what you ski will determine whether or not you should opt for an adjustable ski pole.

If you split your time between the resort or the backcountry or are otherwise curious about the specific performance benefits between the two, here’s a brief list of the pros and cons of each.

Fixed

Fixed poles have the upper hand for in-bounds skiers in almost every respect. Between their comparable affordability and enhanced durability, there’s little reason to consider anything else.

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People tend to step up their riding on the resort, and having a solid piece of metal to depend on is reasonable insurance for riding hard in steep terrain- no one wants their shaft to collapse mid-plant. In a similar sense, if you’re doing the kind of skiing where you’re more likely to fall, it makes sense to invest your money in something that won’t bend when you land on it.

The only place where fixed poles fall short is during travel- if your ski bag is already full it can be difficult to accommodate for the additional bulk. This is by no means a deal breaker but worth considering if you’re prone to making a few destination trips every year.

Adjustable

Telescoping poles are a great tool to add to your backcountry ski kit. Being able to optimize your uphill and downhill use makes climbing much more comfortable while providing the benefits of a full-length pole when it counts.

The sliding size also makes them quite packable, not only in terms of travel but in their ability to collapse inside of a ski pack if you need to go hands-free. This is great if you’re doing any kind of mountaineering, holding an ice axe, or just need a free hand for a steep bootpack.

Additionally, adjustable poles tend to be made up of lightweight materials which are great when you’re covering ground but come at the cost of price and less durable construction. This is exasperated by all of the clamps and moving parts- as they tend to be major points of failure.

Ski Pole Materials

Aluminum

Aluminum is by far the most common material component in your average set of ski poles. It has a couple of significant advantages over lightweight alternatives such as carbon fiber and fiberglass- but none stand out more than price. In most cases, opting for an entirely aluminum pole will end up saving you money.

There are exceptions when it comes to top-tier models, but even these are considerably more affordable than their premium carbon fiber counterparts. But affordable doesn’t mean there aren’t quality aluminum poles out there.

(Video) 🌵3 Best Backcountry Ski Poles 2021

If you’re looking for something lightweight and collapsible, there are plenty of options that compete reasonably well with ultralight poles.

Aluminum also has a competitive edge over other materials when it comes to durability. If you’re rough on your gear or happen to take an unfortunate fall on top of your poles you won’t risk snapping the shaft like in the case of carbon fiber or other brittle materials. At worst, it’ll bend and you can attempt to straighten it out.

Carbon Fiber

From mountain bikes to skis, carbon fiber has solidified itself as a lightweight alternative to traditional materials in contemporary outdoor gear. Regardless of the application, the benefits and drawbacks are always the same. Carbon fiber is much lighter than aluminum alloys and has a little bit of natural flex that more rigid poles lack. These considerable benefits come at the cost of durability.

When stressed beyond a certain threshold, carbon fiber will crack and splinter rather than bend like aluminum. To compensate for the brittle nature of carbon fiber, many poles use aluminum in an effort to save weight but make them more resistant to breaking.

If you’re in the market for a lightweight pole, it’s worth considering the type of skiing you’ll be doing. Those prone to putting strain on gear might be better served by something a little more fleshed out.

Fiberglass

Fiberglass isn’t as prevalent as carbon fiber or aluminum and is almost always blended with other materials to add much needed strength. The only reason you’d want to look for a fiberglass set of poles is to try to save weight without the high cost of carbon fiber.

Ski Pole Anatomy and Features

Grips

When it comes down to it, there isn’t much you can do to optimize your ski pole’s grip. More than anything else this is purely a point of preference and what works for your gloves or mittens.

(Video) How To Choose Your Poles | Faction Skis 2021

If you plan on doing a lot of touring, it can be useful to choose something with an extended soft cuff. This lets you choke up on the pole when the climb gets steep, or you are using the grips to store your mittens when it’s too warm.

Straps

Pole straps are typically nylon loops that keep you from dropping your poles in event of a crash or a poorly timed plant. Having gear go careening down the mountain is a major hazard to other skiers, and saves you the trouble of going searching for it in the long run.

There are a couple of considerations when it comes to your pole straps, but the most important is finding something compatible with your gloves. Note that your hands should go up through the bottom of the straps and wrap around the excess, this helps protect you from getting your thumbs broken if you fall. On that note, some aggressive alpine poles have detachable straps that unhook in the event of serious impact.

If you’re doing the type of skiing where big falls are a reality, this may be well worth looking into. They’re also convenient for getting on and off a lift, saving you a little bit of time on your transition.

Shaft

The width and material of your pole’s shaft is the main determining factor in both weight and strength. As a general rule, the wider the diameter, the stronger and heavier you can expect the pole to be.

Looking at width, consider your needs versus what you can comfortably manage over the course of a day of skiing. Those venturing into the backcountry may prioritize a thinner, lightweight shaft to save fatigue, while resort-bound skiers might look for something more resilient.

Baskets

Baskets keep your poles from penetrating too deep into the snow while you make turn plants- though they come in different shapes and sizes they should be instantly recognizable as the roughly circular discs just above the tips of your pole.

(Video) SKI POLES | How to find the right length?

Basic in-bounds poles usually have a smaller-diameter fixed basket for skiing packed snow on groomers, while poles built with powder in mind have a wider basket to add a little more resistance. If you ski the entire length of the season and want to optimize your performance, it’s worth looking into models with both a powder and a hardpack basket that you can change out as conditions change.

FAQs

Ski Poles for Downhill & Touring? ›

The Top 10 Ski Poles for Downhill & Touring in 2022
  • Best Overall: Volkl Phantastick.
  • Best Performance Pole: Goode G Carbon.
  • Best in Style: Grass Sticks Original Bamboo.
  • Best Value: LEKI Detect S.
  • Best Budget Pole: Salomon Arctic.
  • Best Backcountry Features: G3 Via Carbon.
  • Best Splitboarding Pole: Black Diamond Compactor.

Do you need adjustable ski poles for touring? ›

Consider a slightly longer length if you expect to do a lot of skinning on gentle terrain (eg: low-level hut-to-hut or expeditions). Should I use adjustable or fixed length poles for ski touring? Both have their advantages. Adjustable poles might be more versatile, but fixed-length poles can be stronger and lighter.

What size ski poles do I need for downhill? ›

Can I use trekking poles for ski touring? ›

Sure you can use your treking poles for skiing (leki after all make both). If you are on piste then the smaller baskets are fine. Just for off piste / ski touring you need the bigger baskets.

How do I choose ski poles for touring? ›

Backcountry Ski Poles - How To Select The Best Length ... - YouTube

What length touring poles do I need? ›

Ski Pole Length by Height Chart
Skier HeightPole Length
6'1″ to 6'3″52in (130cm)
5'10 to 6'0″49in (125cm)
5'7″ to 5'9″48in (120cm)
5'4″ to 5'6″46in (115cm)
9 more rows

How tall should ski touring poles be? ›

Ski Pole Height. The optimal length for your ski poles is 126 cm. On ski tours with longer ascents, we recommend individually adjustable telescopic poles in order to alter the length by 5-10 cm during ascent/descent (depending on the inclination of the slope).

Do you need touring poles? ›

Having trekking poles helps keep you stable. If your hike requires stream crossings, trekking poles are great. Having two poles to anchor your way across a series of slippery rocks is invaluable. Even if I'm not using trekking poles on my hike, I'll usually carry them in my pack just for this reason.

Why are adjustable poles used in touring? ›

Fixed grip poles are stronger, lighter, faster (less f**ing around), and cheaper. The only adjustment you need is to your technique. Adjustable poles let people know you're a core backcountry skier when standing in the lift line. My 20 yo Scott poles are great for lift served and touring.

Are cross country poles different from downhill? ›

Cross Country Touring Poles The Right Pair for You When looking for cross country ski poles, you'll also notice that they run longer than downhill poles. This added length will help give you more propulsion as you're skating across flat surfaces.

Why are adjustable poles used in touring? ›

Fixed grip poles are stronger, lighter, faster (less f**ing around), and cheaper. The only adjustment you need is to your technique. Adjustable poles let people know you're a core backcountry skier when standing in the lift line. My 20 yo Scott poles are great for lift served and touring.

Do you need touring poles? ›

Having trekking poles helps keep you stable. If your hike requires stream crossings, trekking poles are great. Having two poles to anchor your way across a series of slippery rocks is invaluable. Even if I'm not using trekking poles on my hike, I'll usually carry them in my pack just for this reason.

Why are backcountry ski poles adjustable? ›

Extended grip– Perhaps the most important attribute of a backcountry-specific pole is the extended grip. Underneath the primary grip that you would hold for downhill skiing is a secondary or extended grip. This allows you to choke up on the pole and hold it further down the shaft. This is very important on the ascent.

To help you make the best choice among the hundreds of products available, we have decided to offer you a comparison of the Downhill Ski Poles in order to find the best quality/price ratio.. Rossignol Tactic Ski Poles Black/Military Green 115cm (46in) Strong and Lightweight - Aluminum dural shaft is light and durable Secure, Comfortable Grip - Bi-injected components help absorb vibration transmitted up the pole for a more secure grip and all-day comfort The Tactic aluminum ski pole offers all-mountain versatility in a durable aluminum shaft that balances strength and weight.. Ski Team Official Supplier (Midnight Black, 48" in./122 cm) GRAPHITE CARBON COMPOSITE TECHNOLOGY - High modulus carbon fiber graphite replaces the outdated aluminum of most ski poles, resulting in a pole that reduces vibration with every pole pant and is extremely lightweight and durable STIFF 16.0mm TAPERED SKI POLE - Pole shaft tapers from 16.0mm at the handle to 14.0mm at the tip for a stiffer pole with a lighter swing-weight that is used by World Cup and Olympic Gold Medal athletes like David Wise.. 4 LEKI Peak Vario 3D Ski Pole Pair If you're just as at home arcing GS turns as you are traversing to untouched lines in the back bowls, the PEAK VARIO 3D is the ski pole you've been looking for.. Ski Bag and Ski Boot Bag Combo for Air Travel Unpadded - Ski Luggage Bags for Snow Travel Gear - Ski Case for Cross Country, Downhill, Boots, Helmet, Poles, Clothes and Accessories Unpadded Ski Bag and Ski Boot Bag Combo for Air Travel.. Ski Team Official Ski Pole - Universal ✓ UNIVERSAL FIT - Accommodates poles from 14mm - 18mm diameter shaft only if grip has a "screw" in the top of the grip.. 8 Swix Techline ski Poles Techlite Performance Aluminum Ski Poles 2017 Model Pair New (115cm) Swix Techline ski poles Techlite performance aluminum Ski poles 2022 model pair New pick size from drop down menu above new alpine poles with baskets ready to use Swix Techline ski poles Techlite, performance aluminum poles 2022 model New Recommended use: Recreational skiing single density handle ,include basket Techlite, performance aluminum Good functional aluminum pole with Swix single density handle and and basket for groomed slopes.. Goode | SuperMax Plus Composite Ski Pole Pair | Light Pencil Shafts | Medium Swing Weight | Highest Shock Absorption | Mountain, Alpine, Downhill Skiing Gear ⛷️ FEEL LIKE YOU'RE FLYING - At only 650g per pair or about half of the alloy varieties, our skiing poles are incredibly light.. 10 2 Pack Ski Carrier Strap and Poles Carrier, Adjustabl Shoulder Sling with Cushioned Holder Protects from Scratches, Downhill Skiing Backcountry Gear Ski Accessories for Men, Women and Kids ✅【Adjustable Length】 Adjustable ski straps can change length for optimal comfort.. Ski carry holder includes velcro ski pole carrier to hold your skis and poles all in one shoulder ski sling.. ✅【Free Your Hands】The one-shoulder ski carrier strap and pole carrier can wrap the skis and poles together and then hang them on the shoulders.. With this ski strap, it is easy to help children carry skis and poles.

Besides length, you will have to consider many other factors and features to get your hands on the right ski poles so that nothing gets in the way of you having the best skiing experience in the snow.. While poles designed for men are usually longer and have various styles, women’s poles are relatively shorter and come with small grips to accommodate their hands.. Composite Ski poles built with composite materials are the strongest, most durable, and best for skiing in a resort.. Having a pair of ski poles is necessary to get the best ever skiing experience.. Women’s ski poles are mostly shorter in length and can extend up to 120 cm, whereas men or unisex poles are slightly longer and have lengths up to 135 cm.. As you get better with time, you can try out different types of poles like downhill ski poles and backcountry ski poles to level up your skiing experience.

However, if you want to have the best skiing experience away from the resorts and groomed runs, you’re going to need the best set of backcountry ski poles.. Backcountry ski poles are designed specifically for those who are trekking away from the crowded runs at resorts in search of fresh powder and a truly wild ski environment.. To that end, they need to be multifunctional: able to act as a hiking pole as you ascend the mountain before converting to a ski pole for when you descend.. Not only will a solid set of ski backcountry ski poles help get you from A to B, but they’ll help you maintain stability and the speed necessary to aggressively tackle a run.. For more of our top ski gear recommendations, check out the Best Ski Poles .. BEST ULTRALIGHT POLES Weighing in at just 10.4 ounces for the entire pair, the Black Diamond Vapor Carbon ski poles are the lightest backcountry ski poles on the market.. One potential drawback of these poles is their lack of compact adjustment as many backcountry skiers prefer a pole that can be packed away easily.. Features External Lever-Lock Uses Friction To Keep Adjusted Length Secure Baskets Can Be Swapped Out For Hiking (sold seperately) Or Skiing Adjustable Width Straps Accommodate Bare Hands For Hiking And Gloves For Winter. BEST POWDER AND OFF-PISTE POLES When hitting fresh powder and backcountry runs, the Dynafit Speed Vario 2.0 are the best ski poles you can possibly have in your arsenal.. BEST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK POLES Easy on the wallet and packed with features, the Atomic Backland FR ski poles are truly the best bang for your buck.. When determining the right size ski pole , make sure that you’re wearing either shoes or your ski boots.. If your arm is less than 90° degrees, then the pole is too large; consequently if the bend in your arm is more than 90° degrees, then the pole is too small.. Ski pole straps have a twofold purpose: to help you form a better grip when planting your poles and to keep your poles with you (read: attached to your person) should you wipe out.. The basket of a ski pole is a small collar near the tip of your ski pole.. The pointed ends (bottoms) of the ski pole that help you plant your pole in the snow/ground.

To make sure you ski pole length is correct, turn your alpine ski pole UPSIDE DOWN and grab your pole under the basket or on the grip side of the basket.. Pole length can vary for people the same height because of different arm lengths.. SKIERS HEIGHTDOWNHILL ski pole inINCHESDOWNHILL ski pole in centimetersCROSS COUNTRY classic pole in centimeters3’ 2”not recommendednot recommended80 cm3’ 3” - 3’ 4”32”80 cm80 cm3’ 5” - 3’ 7”34”85 cm85 cm3’ 8” - 3’ 9”34” - 36”85 - 90 cm85 - 90 cm3’ 10” - 3’ 11”36”90 cm90 cm4’ - 4’ 1”36” - 38”90 - 95 cm95 cm4’ 2” - 4’ 3”38”95 cm100 cm4’ 4” - 4’ 5”38” - 40”90 - 95 cm100 - 105 cm4’ 6” - 4’ 8”40” 100 cm105 - 110 cm4’ 8” - 4’ 9”40” 100 cm100 - 115 cm4’ 10” - 4’ 11”40” - 42”100 - 105 cm120 cm5’ 42” - 44”105 - 110 cm125 cm5’ 1” 44” 110 cm125 cm5’ 2” 44” 110 cm130 cm5’ 3” 44” - 46”110 - 115 cm130 cm5’ 4” 46” 115 cm135 cm5’ 5” 46” 115 cm135 cm5’ 6” 46” - 48”115 - 120 cm140 cm5’ 7” 48” 120 cm140 cm5’ 8” 48” 120 cm145 cm5’ 9” 48” - 50”120 - 125 cm145 cm5’ 10” 48” - 50”120 - 125 cm150 cm5’ 11” 50” 125 cm150 cm6’ 50” 125 cm155 cm6’ 1” 52” 125 - 130 cm155 cm6’ 2” 52” 130 cm160 cm6’ 3” 52” 130 - 135 cm160 cm6’ 4” 54” 135 cm165 cm6’ 5” 54” 135 cm165 cm. A longer pole will help keep your body in better balance and allow you to put your weight on the proper ski easier.. Check your ski pole length by putting your pole UNDER your arm pit.. A longer pole can help.. Ski poles are usually the last thing you think about when getting new equipment.. In most cases, after the work in finding a pair of boots that fit well and the big decision of which skis to get, the choice of ski poles falls to: What's cheap and looks good with my skis?. Alpine Accessories offers a wide range of price choices, starting at the basic $29.00 and ending with the Leki Trigger Grip Ski Poles at $100.. Even though ski poles are now made in other materials, aluminum is still one of the main types of ski pole on the market.. Aluminum Shaft: Cheap ski poles will use a lower cost aluminum alloy which will cause them to be a little heavier and break easier.. Aluminum poles are a good inexpensive pole for beginners, the aluminum pole is preferred by trick skiers and many racers because it will not bend with the pressure they require.. Composite Shaft: Manufactures are now producing ski poles made of fiberglass, and other specialized materials.. On the higher price poles, improvements can be found in performance and safety as seen on the (above) Leki Vantage S. Their unique Leki Trigger System gives you an adjustable strap that securely wraps around your gloves but attaches and detaches from the pole by the press of a button.. Like the above section on aluminum poles, the material of the pole, the ice tip and the grip determine the cost.

Add 2 inches (or 5 centimeters) to your measured, rounded dimension to account for the section of the pole that will be sticking into the snow, since all ski poles are measured from the tip that sticks into the snow to the top of the handle.. Once you have your personal ski pole size, shop for a fixed ski pole that comes in that dimension, or an extendable ski pole that has your dimension in its allowable range.. Round that measured length to 45 inches, then add two inches for a total length of 47 inches.Some ski poles only show their lengths in metric dimensions, so be sure to pay attention to the units of measurement.. Ski Pole Length by Height Chart If you don’t have a tape measure handy, check out the chart below for a quick guide to finding your correct ski pole size.Just keep in mind, everyone is different and you may need to adjust up or down a size or two depending on how long you prefer your ski pole.. Most ski pole shafts are made from aluminum and carbon fiber, but you can also find poles built with titanium and bamboo.. Ski Pole Basket The ski pole basket plays an essential role if you plan to venture into more challenging terrain.. Regardless, every ski pole basket will work in a pinch, but may not be the best choice for certain skiing activities—an aerodynamic racing ski pole basket will not be very useful in 3 feet of powder, and a powder basket will cause unnecessary drag in a tucked downhill racing stance.

Designed for unisex use, the length on these poles can be adjusted, giving a range between 105cm and 125cm.. There are six different lengths to choose from, ranging from 115cm to 135cm.. These top of the range ski poles are made for kids who are seriously getting into skiing.. These telescopic poles are designed for unisex use and will suit a range of different conditions.. The moulded handles and adjustable straps will also make these ski poles easy to use.. Ski poles come in standard sizes, which means depending on your height, they might not be quite the right length for you.

As a kid, we used to just say: “poles are poles.” But whether you’re into splitboarding, alpine touring, or just skiing laps at the resort, it actually makes a massive difference to have the right pole for the job.. We’ve completely destroyed some adjustable touring poles when skiing in-bounds, and we’ve fumbled with non-adjustable fixed-length ski poles in the backcountry.. There are a couple of questions you have to get right with poles, the first of which is the right length of pole.. What size ski poles do you need?. For most people, this means that while holding the pole when you are standing in your ski boots and the pole is vertical, your elbow should be at about a 90-degree angle.. But in that case you’ll definitely want an adjustable pole, since once you’ve completed that section you’ll want to bring them back to a natural length.. For someone about 5’ 9” to 6’ tall that usually means a 120cm pole length; for shorter than 5’ 9” you’ll want to consider 115cm or shorter.. But in that case you’ll definitely want an adjustable pole, since once you’ve completed that section you’ll want to bring them back to a natural length.. For someone about 5’ 9” to 6’ tall that usually means a 125cm pole length; for shorter than 5’ 9” you’ll want to consider 120cm or shorter.. Any construction of pole that cuts it into segments for adjustable length or collapsibility is going to reduce the strength of the pole and increase its chances of breakage.. So if you are picking a pair of poles for mostly resort-based skiing, with a few short tours and sidecountry laps, a fixed-length pole will almost certainly be adequate and will last you longer.. For most downhill laps, the weight of the pole is less important and you’ll mostly care about minimizing the swing weight caused by the size of the basket.. Lots of great accessories have been created for poles lately, which will help you make them not just do double-duty with touring and resort skiing, but triple-duty as a trekking pole or even a camera monopod.. If you’re in the market for a new pair of ski poles or even your first pair of ski poles, shop our selection of ski poles and accessories at Gear.com.

Designed for unisex use, the length on these poles can be adjusted, giving a range between 105cm and 125cm.. The aluminium alloy poles are lightweight and the small basket near the tip means it’s best in hard snow conditions, rather than off piste.. Four different lengths are available, ranging from 115cm to 130cm.. The rubber handles make these poles easy to grip while the straps are adjustable.. There are six different lengths to choose from, ranging from 115cm to 135cm.. These telescopic poles are designed for unisex use and will suit a range of different conditions.. The moulded handles and adjustable straps will also make these ski poles easy to use.. The shorter length means they’re better for race skiers who might need poles more for balance.. Ski poles come in standard sizes, which means depending on your height, they might not be quite the right length for you.

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